Pa. 2019 municipal primary: Key dates and what you need to know

  • Ed Mahon, PA Post
Editor’s note: This story was updated to include the results of two special elections on March 12.

 

This year, voters in Pennsylvania will elect judges, county commissioners, district attorneys, mayors, school board members and other local leaders.

There will also be special elections for two state Senate seats and one U.S. congressional seat on May 21, the same day as the municipal primary.

Here are the key dates for the 2019 municipal primary and general election, as well as what you need to know about the special elections.

Key dates for the primary

March 12: Last day to circulate and file nomination petitions to appear on the May 21 primary ballot.

March 27: Last for day candidates to withdraw from the primary.

April 22: If you aren’t registered to vote, this day is your last chance to do so if you want to vote in the May 21 primary.

May 14: Last day to apply for a civilian absentee ballot for the primary — although it’s wise to apply earlier because of the state’s tight absentee ballot law.

May 17: Last day for a county board of elections to receive voted civilian absentee ballots.

May 21: Voting day for the municipal primary.

May 28: Last day for a county board of elections to receive voted military and overseas absentee ballots.

Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney listens during a news conference at City Hall in Philadelphia, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019.

Matt Rourke / AP Photo

Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney listens during a news conference at City Hall in Philadelphia, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019. He is up for re-election this year.

Key general election dates

Aug. 1: Last day to circulate and file nomination papers for non-major party candidates.

Aug. 8: Last day to withdraw for non-major party candidates.

Aug. 12: Last day to withdraw for candidates nominated in the primary.

Oct. 7: If you aren’t registered to vote, this day is your last chance to do so if you want to vote in the Nov. 5 election.

Oct. 29: Last day to apply for a civilian absentee ballot — although, just like for the primary, it’s wise to apply earlier because of the state’s tight absentee ballot law.

Nov. 1: Last day for a county board of elections to receive voted civilian absentee ballots.

Nov. 5: Voting day for the municipal election.

Nov. 12: Last day for a county board of elections to receive voted military and overseas absentee ballots.

Special elections

March 12: Two special elections for state House seats were held. Democrat Movita Johnson-Harrell won the 190th seat in Philadelphia. Democrat Bridget Malloy Kosierowski was elected to the other seat, the 114th in Lackawanna County. Both seats were previously held by Democrats.

April 2: Special election for the 37th state Senate seat, which includes parts of Allegheny and Washington counties in southwestern Pennsylvania. The seat was previously held by a Republican.

May 21: Special elections for one U.S. congressional seat and two state Senate seats will take place on the same day as the municipal primary.

They are: the 41st Senate District, which includes all of Armstrong and Indiana counties, plus part of Butler and Westmoreland counties; and the 33rd Senate District, which includes all of Adams County, plus parts of Cumberland, Franklin and York counties.

For the congressional seat, voters will pick a replacement for former U.S. Rep. Tom Marino. Pennsylvania’s 12th Congressional District covers a large stretch of central and northern Pennsylvania, from the New York border down to Juniata and Perry counties.

Image courtesy of the Pa. Department of State

Pennsylvania’s 12th Congressional District

 

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