Grand jury report fallout, 2.0

  • Emily Previti

From The Context, PA Post’s weekday email newsletter:

Some state lawmakers are pushing to overhaul Pennsylvania’s redistricting process. General consensus is that they blew a deadline last session for a constitutional amendment, but there are other ideas on the table to enact changes. WITF’s Capitol Bureau Chief Katie Meyer lays them out here. -Emily Previti, Newsletter Producer/Reporter

‘An invisible minority’

Patricia Cahill (right) greets Sister Eileen Shaw, the nun she says sexually abused her, at an event at Paramus Catholic High School, Bergen County, N.J. in 1970.

Courtesy of Patricia Cahill

Patricia Cahill (right) greets Sister Eileen Shaw, the nun she says sexually abused her, at an event at Paramus Catholic High School, Bergen County, N.J. in 1970. Cahill now lives in Lancaster.

  • Last summer’s grand jury report on child sexual abuse in Catholic churches in Pennsylvania — and subsequent fallout and additional, similar reports and investigations around the globe — focused on priests and their victims. Those who accuse nuns of abuse say they’ve been ignored. WHYY’s Laura Benshoff talked to some of them for this story — including one Lancaster woman who’s still dedicating hours a day to attempting to heal, 40 years later.

  • Meanwhile, the state Legislature has yet to make any changes to the commonwealth’s related laws, despite much debate over doing so in the wake of the grand jury report. Efforts failed during the last session, so lawmakers in each chamber are trying again, according to this Associated Press report.

  • And this analysis from PennLive’s Ivey DeJesus explains the significance of linking the legislation, aspects of which strike at least one lawmaker as overreaching.

Best of the rest

Six candidates for York County commissioner participate in a forum on April 10, 2019, at Zion United Church of Christ in York.

Ed Mahon / PA Post

Six candidates for York County commissioner participate in a forum Tuesday at Zion United Church of Christ in York.

  • It’s been almost a year since former York County Commissioner Steve Chronister called the cops on five black women during their round of golf at a local country club, a story that sparked national media attention and a state Human Relations Commission investigation. Now, Chronister’s seeking his old elected office — and skipped a forum organized by African American Leadership Roundtable II this week because, he told PA Post’s Ed Mahon, he didn’t “want to make it into a carnival event.”

  • About 28 percent of Pa.’s utility workers will retire within five years. StateImpact Pennsylvania’s Amy Sisk reports in her story about how power companies are trying to prepare the next generation of workers to fill those forthcoming job openings.

  • One midstate school district is looking at expanding its trespassing policy to include drones. The Carlisle Sentinel reports the considerations come after someone used an unmanned aerial vehicle to take photos of a student walkout last year, one of many nationwide coordinated to mourn victims and show solidarity with survivors of the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla.


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