Where more than $1 billion in Pa. lottery profit goes

  • Ed Mahon, PA Post

From The Context, PA Post’s weekday email newsletter:

A bear showed up in a neighborhood about a mile from the state Capitol on Saturday. WITF’s Katie Meyer and Brett Sholtis reported from the scene with great photos and interesting facts (including how often bears tend to show up in Harrisburg — it was more than I would have guessed.) –Ed Mahon, PA Post reporter

A debate over Medicaid funding

A Powerball ticket purchased in a convenience store in Lancaster, Pa., is held in front of a Pennsylvania Lottery computer screen advertising the record $1.4 billion Powerball jackpot, Jan. 11, 2015, in this file photo.

Gene J. Puskar / Associated Press

A Powerball ticket purchased in a convenience store in Lancaster, Pa., is held in front of a Pennsylvania Lottery computer screen advertising the record $1.4 billion Powerball jackpot, Jan. 11, 2015, in this file photo.

  • Sandi Bush, who moved to Pennsylvania about five years ago, wanted to know where state lottery money goes. She submitted a question to the Listening Post.

  • I knew that Pennsylvania dedicates its lottery money to older residents. But I wasn’t familiar with the debate over whether some of that money should help fund Medicaid programs. The practice started back when Democrat Ed Rendell was governor, and for this year’s budget, Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf wants to transfer about $400 million from the PA Lottery to the Department of Human Services.

  • If you’re interested in more about the PA Lottery, check out this story from WESA. It describes how, almost 40 years ago, a group of people in the Pittsburgh area rigged the televised lottery. “What happened in 1980 could never happen again,” the lottery’s executive director said.

Best of the rest

Parishioners pray the Rosary at Holy Infancy Roman Catholic Church in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania after mass on Tuesday, August 14, 2018. The same day, Pennsylvania Attorney General released his two-year grand jury investigation into widespread sexual abuse and cover-up within six Catholic dioceses across the state.

Lindsay Lazarski / WHYY

Parishioners pray the Rosary at Holy Infancy Roman Catholic Church in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania after mass on Tuesday, August 14, 2018. The same day, Pennsylvania Attorney General released his two-year grand jury investigation into widespread sexual abuse and cover-up within six Catholic dioceses across the state.


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